Eurovision Insight Podcast: The Last Chat From Stockholm, Sunday May 15th 2016 Written by on May 15, 2016 | 4 Comments

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Settle down with the team over a  quiet coffee in Stockholm Central Library’s cafe during the afternoon after leaving the Euroclub as the sun rose on the morning after the night of Ukraine’s victory at the Eurovision Song Contest 2016. How do we feel about the victory, what about the other competitors, and what happens next?

Eurovision Insight Podcast: The Last Chat From Stockholm, Sunday May 15th 2016

There’s time for one final podcast from Stockholm as we all get ready to fly home. Ewan Spence looks over some of the results and implications from the 2016 Song Contest with Ben Robertson, Samantha Ross, and Lisa-Jayne Lewis.

As we head into the quiet summer, keep up to date with all of the Eurovision news by subscribing to the ESC Insight podcast and our daily shows. You’ll find the show in iTunes, and a direct RSS feed is also available. We also have a regular email newsletter which you can sign up to here.

About The Author: Ewan Spence

British Academy (BAFTA) nominated broadcaster and writer Ewan Spence is the voice behind The Unofficial Eurovision Song Contest Podcast and one of the driving forces behind ESC Insight. Having had an online presence since 1994, he is a noted commentator around the intersection of the media, internet, technology, mobility and how it affects us all. Based in Edinburgh, Scotland, his work has appeared on the BBC, The Stage, STV, and The Times. You can follow Ewan on Twitter (@ewan) and Facebook (facebook.com/ewanspence).

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4 responses to “Eurovision Insight Podcast: The Last Chat From Stockholm, Sunday May 15th 2016”

  1. Matt says:

    Ewan, all I can say is thank you for all the hard work this year. But please pass on my thanks and congratulations to the rest of the gang, for all they have done during the Eurovision year.

    But an extra special thank you, for showing the expetionaly rare showing of the full song at the end. If I remember correctly, that is only done on special occasions or at the end of the Eurovision year.

    Well, for me, while everyone is taking a very well earnt break and wouldn’t be back until about mid August. I’ll be taking a 2 week break and then start all over again, with the local fan group in Australia, with a few of us going from the very start of the juniors national finals season, all the way to the big show at the adult contest. I would love to invite the insight gang to #join us for this insane ride.

  2. Ben Pitchers says:

    Thanks to everyone on the team for the great podcasts and long-form pieces; I’ve enjoyed them immensely.

    It was a great Eurovision and it was fantastic to have a surprise winner that couldn’t be more different from the last few winning songs. Watching with friends we couldn’t quite believe that Poland hadn’t been called yet when the televoting was revealed. I wonder if the length of the voting window in the final had anything to do with it. Instead of the 15 minutes published in the rules, the voting window actually lasted just over 42 minutes by my count. The could perhaps have opened up plenty more time for people to cast multiple votes and possibly for diaspora fans to do so in supporting their respective home nations.

    I think SVT made a success of the new voting system. The jury votes seemed to go by much too fast. Perhaps next year we can have a little less filler and more time for voting and have the spokespersons read out the 8, 10 and 12 points again? The scoreboard isn’t shown for very long during the jury vote so it makes it harder to keep track. However, the public vote reveal happened slowly enough so that you could digest the results and keep an eye on where a song was going to end up.

  3. Zolan says:

    While it was a great show in many ways, I found the televote presentation very unpleasant. The efforts to mislead the audience about what the reveals actually meant for the sake of heightened drama were unconvincing and insistent, breaking any sense of trust or connection with the presenters. If they can’t make it effective with honesty, then it won’t last long.

  4. Shai says:

    I did a quick checking. Only 6/7 countries out of the 41 countries allowed to vote for Poland, didn’t give any point by televoting for Poland. This beyond diaspora voting. I can only attribute this to him selling the song very well.

    Germany was voting in the 2nd semi and gave Poland 12 televote points in the semi. France was voting in the 1st semi.

    Like Ben said above – around 45 minutes voting window was a bit too much. Should they shorten that, than we would be less than 3 h 40 m, run of the show. Hadn’t we agree after last year that above 3 and half hours is way too long.That said, it was much amusing and didn’t seems that long.Nevertheless, please make the show not longer than 3 and half hours.

    Thank you all for a wonderful coverage-I’ll be back next year for more.

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